The “Sairat” Review

Have you ever been haunted ? Like really followed by something everywhere you went. Something that would not let go of your consciousness, something that would reverberate in your ears without any discernible source, something that would wrench your chest every time you thought of it…We were not sure we wanted to write this review but we just couldn’t stay away. It felt like blasphemy not to write about this !

Sairat is not a film, its a psychological experiment designed to gauge your reaction when every rule of film-making, to which you have been conditioned to, is splintered to pieces. Directed by Nagraj Manjule Sairat is the story of every average Indian youngster who dares to break out of years of cultural baggage and societal discrimination. Manjule must have sat down with his writers one day and had a conversation which must’ve gone like – “Make a list of things which should never happen to the protagonist. Let’s do all those things to them !”

Make a list of things which should never happen to the protagonist. Let’s do all those things to them !

This is the story of Prashant or Parshya (played by Akash Thosar) who comes from a very simple farmer family in a small coastal village, Bitargaon, in Maharashtra who falls in love with the local politician’s daughter Archana or Archi (played by Rinku Rajguru). At this point, you will probably pfft and say to yourself – “Oh I have heard this story a thousand times!”. And you are probably right. The story is not new nor is the societal construct. What is unwittingly, undeniably different is the wildly paced screenplay and the mesmerising cinematography, by Sudhakar Reddy Yakkanti (this guy doesn’t even have a wiki page), which both characters embody beautifully into the story.

sairat-marathi-movie
One of the most powerful scenes in the film when they abscond from the captors as the world literally burns !

Parshya is every bit the shy, innocent, free-minded young dreamer whose only chance at a good life for his family is a decent education whereas Archi is a strong, independent and pampered young girl who lacks no want in life. Their love-story is breezy, child-like and pure but you can’t help but feel an unsettling sense of chaotic disorder which threatens to burn down their world which seems too good to be true. Their only support system are their school friends Salim and Pradeep who dote on them unconditionally and are willing to give their very lives so that they could live theirs.

Their love-story is breezy, child-like and pure but you can’t help but feel an unsettling sense of chaotic disorder which threatens to burn down their world which seems too good to be true. 

Accompanied by an incredible score, Sairat burns deep into your memory. From the playful and vivacious Yad Lagla to the contemporary-rock fusion in Aatach Baya Ka Bavarla to the utterly compelling Sairat Zaala Ji, the soundtracks bring out a mixture of melancholy and unpredictability in your psyché. Music directors Ajay-Atul, who have also given the beautiful background score in Agneepath (2012), have captured the essence of the film through a delicate combination of ethnic Marathi and alternative rock. Do check out the amazing soundtracks here:

As many articles have quoted, Manjule has sparked a revolution, which has been evident from the resounding success of a film which has earned more than 70 crore in the domestic box office. Such stories have been and will be relevant until we grow out of the class struggle that is still predominant in the small-town India, shown precisely in this eye-opening piece by Suhas Bhasme from The Wire:

“In challenging Brahmanical hegemony, and class and gender norms, Sairat reflects Ambedkar’s vision of a just and egalitarian society.”

Manjule’s Sairat is the dirty, grimey mirror of our society at which we are afraid to look into. You leave the theatre in an overwhelming solemnity finding it difficult to come to terms with the story, knowing deep inside that it’s just stark reality.

gobblscore: 7.5/10

gobblpoint: Some of the most breath-taking cinematography we have seen in a long time and an immensely powerful story with an ending which will hit you unawares.

 

Disclaimer: The images used in this post are the sole property of the makers of this film and are not owned by us in any form whatsoever. 

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